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Post By @CubanWindow

WIF: CubaDebate + EngageCuba

US Senator and Republican lawmaker for Kansas, Jerry Moran would introduce the Trade Act with Cuba into Congress to effectively lift the economic, commercial and financial blockade imposed by Washington and would allow the US private sector to trade freely with the island (This bill was introduced on June 10, 2015, in a previous session of Congress, but was not enacted.)

 

Introduced in House (01/11/2017) * Post at Congress Official Site

 

 

Cuba Trade Act of 2017

This bill repeals or amends current laws restricting trade with Cuba.

The prohibition on assistance to Cuba, and the President’s authority for the embargo on Cuba, under the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 are eliminated.

The Cuban Democracy Act of 1992 is amended to eliminate:

  • presidential authority to impose sanctions against Cuban trading partners,
  • restrictions on transactions between U.S.-owned or controlled firms and Cuba,
  • limitations on direct shipping between Cuban and U.S. ports, and
  • restrictions on remittances.

The Cuban Liberty and Democratic Solidarity (LIBERTAD) Act of 1996 is amended to eliminate:

  • the enforcement of an economic embargo of Cuban provisions, and
  • the prohibition on indirect financing of Cuba.

The Trade Sanctions Reform and Export Enhancement Act of 2000 is amended to:

  • remove Cuba from the list of state sponsors of terrorism subject to agricultural and medical export restrictions;
  • eliminate the prohibition on U.S. assistance, including foreign assistance, export assistance, and any credit or guarantees being made available for exports to Cuba;
  • eliminate the prohibition against a U.S. person’s providing payment or financing terms for sales of agricultural commodities or products to Cuba;
  • prohibit the United States from providing any foreign assistance to Cuba or any financial assistance, loans, loan guarantees, extension of credit, or other financing for exports to Cuba; and
  • eliminate the prohibition on the U.S. entry of merchandise that is of Cuban origin, is or has been located in or transported from or through Cuba, or is made or derived in whole or in part of any article which is the growth, produce, or manufacture of Cuba.

The federal government may not obligate or expend any funds to promote trade with or develop markets in Cuba, except through certain commodity promotion programs.

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